Test Preparation

This page contains information pertaining to the requirements needed for the rank of 5th KYU.  Some of this information overlaps with the 6th KYU test.  However there are improvement in technique that is going to be looked for.

Shomen Uchi Ikkyo

(Hand Bladed Strike to top of head (Shomen uchi), First control form(Ikkyo))

Omote Waza (Front Pin)

  • Uke and Nage are in Gyankuhamni
  • Nage performs a hand to the face motion with the front hand (same side as back leg) to get a reaction from the Uke.
  • Uke raises their front arm to block.
  • Nage takes a single step with the front leg to the front of the Uke.  At the same time the back hand goes under the elbow while the front hand expresses kokyu and meets at the back of the hand of Uke.  The back hand at Uke’s elbow should “get under” the elbow and Nage’s body should impose itself on Uke’s center. This should get Uke “just” on his back foot and slightly off balance. (This is key for 5th KYU).  In addition, at this time the front hand should not necessarily grab Uke’s wrist. That happens as part of the second step. If possible the nuckle at the base of the middle finger should find the humorous of Uke’s arm.
  • Nage takes a second step forward while taking the Uke’s elbow up and around with the wrist being brought out causing the Uke to bend over at the waist.  A few things to look for at this position: Both arms should have kokyu and Nage should have his center over the arms. The elbow of Uke should be pointed away from Nage, this will happen with proper application of base of middle finger knuckle to humorous is in place. Nage’s back should be straight and hips forward.
  • The Nage then takes a step with the back leg at a 45% angle through the body of Uke and toward the ground.  The intent is to drive the shoulder to the mat via proper application of force on the elbow and wrist. Nage is not using arm strength to pin Uke, but instead applying his body weight through his unbending arms.
  • Once Uke’s shoulder is on the mat Nage places the original back leg knee in the shoulder of Uke, then his other knee on the mat. Nage’s back and head should be straight and upright.  Nage’s arms should continue to have kokyu. Feet should NOT be flat!  If necessary the arm placement of Uke may be higher than Uke’s shoulder level, insuring that the Uke cannot reach around and grab Nage.

Ura Waza (Back Pin)

  • Uke and Nage are in Gyankuhamni
  • Nage performs a neck grab motion with the front hand (same side as front leg) to get a reaction from the Uke.
  • Uke raises their front arm to block.
  • Nage takes a step with the back leg to the back foot of Uke. At the same time the back hand goes under the elbow while the front hand expresses Kokyu to the back of Uke’s hand and brings Uke’s hand down. This should form that proverbial “mountains peak”.  The step in and work with the Uke’s arm should also result in Nage getting Uke slightly off balance.
  • Nage leaves the foot that made the foot step firmly planted.  Nage then performs a full tenkan while using the grabed arm as a fulcrum to drive Uke’s body down and around.
  • Finish the pin exactly as the omote waza form of this move.

Kata Dori Nikkyo

Omote Waza (Front Pin)

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkxbfU5VzRQ

  • Uke and Nage are in Aiamni.
  • Nage offers his front shoulder to Uke.
  • Uke gets a good grasp on the shoulder.
  • Nage gets off the line and changes hamni.  The front foot becomes the back foot, and the back foot the front.  The new front foot should be pointing directly at Uke and the back foot completing a solid Hamni.  Nage’s front hand goes behind and low into Kokyu (this pulls the attacker toward you and off balance) the front hand makes a fist and goes to the face of Uke.
  • Uke blocks the fist to the face.
  • Nage takes the hand that went to Uke’s face and reaches back and performs a Nikkyo grasp on the hand that is holding the shoulder.  The back hand comes under and goes to the elbow (knuckle to humorous).
  • Front foot steps forward once. Fulcrum the arm over.
  • Front foot steps forward twice.  (See Ikkyo Omote Waza at this point. Same deal, but the grab is Nikkyo now.)
  • Back foot steps through the 45% like in Ikkyo.
  • The Pin is different. Once you have the shoulder to the mat, one knee goes to the crook of the neck (first), the other goes to the underarm. Keeping Nikkyo reach across with the free hand so that your elbow goes over the held arms wrist/forearm. That hand grabs the shoulder of your gi effectively pinning the arm to your center.  Release Nikkyo (you may have to work that hand loose, but do not let the pinned arm free).  Place the free arm across the elbow. The entire time you should have your center on the arm keeping the shoulder pined.  Complete the pin by rotating toward the head as you relax into your center.

Ura Waza (Back Pin)

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0R1-MfjDWC0

Katate Dori Shihonage

Omote Waza

  • Uke and Nage are in Gyankuhamni
  • Uke performs Katate Dori – Uke grabs the wrist on the same side as the Nage’s forward foot with one hand.
  • Nage performs a “90 degree Irimi” to the front side of the Uke.  As so:
    • The front foot steps away from the back foot to the side of Uke, keeping its orientation.
    • The back foot steps forward so that it is now the “front foot” of a proper hamni.
    • In other words: “The front foot becomes the back foot, and the back foot becomes the front foot.”
    • When done properly the Nage should be “off the line”.  Uke’s front foot should be pointing to empty space, not between Nage’s legs… OUCH!
  • During the 90 degree Irimi the captured arm performs Kokyu.  This exposes the palm and wrist of the attacking hand.  (This completes the blend portion.)
  • Nage’s free hand grasps Uke hand in a Shihonage grasp.  (I could not find a good picture, take one) The grasp involves your hand covering the “palm” portion of their hand.  Your pinky finger should wrap around the knife edge of their hand, while your thumb grasps the knuckle on the back if their thumb.
  • Perform the “step through”. (This is the “lead”.)
    • Step through with the back leg (this leg should be between your front foot and the Uke.
    • While stepping through bring your shoulder under the shoulder of Uke’s grasping arm. Their arm should be somewhat on top of yours. (You are “underneath” the Uke.)
    • Perform a 180 degree turn away from Uke while bringing the captured hand around and over your shoulder. Your hand should come free of the grasp at this time and assist your Shihonage hand in the rest of the move.
    • The newly captured hand of Uke should go to Uke’s shoulder.  Your arms should be outstretched (proper kokyu).
  • At this point Uke should be ready to be thrown.  Drop your center just a bit and Uke should start to fall in the direction that you are facing. The timing here is important.  You MUST step with Uke as they fall and bring your hand down so that you do not separate their hand from their shoulder. If you do not perform this carefully and with compassion you can damage Uke’s trapped wrist.
    • Let the start to fall first, figure out where Uke’s shoulder will touch the floor, and then step to that point and bring the captured hand to that point.
    • If you try to step first, you will most likely have to play “catch-up” which will result in your taking too many steps and not being in the correct position to keep the strain off the wrist.
  • Things to considerations when performing this technique:
    • If your opponent spins out during the lead perform the step through again.  (You can even get it tighter.)
    • If you catch your opponent spinning out while you perform your rotation you can “short-cut” the move by stepping back early. (Takes some practice, and this is not a cheat.)
    • Make sure to keep shoulder contact with Uke during all parts of this technique.
    • Before the throw Uke may choose to grasp the Nage’s ghi to insure that excessive separation does not occur during the throw.
  • The Pin to this technique is just holding the captured hand to the ground.  Head up. Back straight.  Be aware of other attackers.

Ura Waza

  • Uke and Nage are in Gyankuhamni
  • Uke performs Katate Dori – Uke grabs the wrist on the same side as the Nage’s forward foot with one hand.
  • Nage performs a two-step. (Since Ura almost always requires a tenkan, and the Uke’s footing is not in Ai-hamni, a two steps puts Nage’s footing in the correct placement): The nage’s back foot steps forward to the Uke’s front foot.  (Big toe of Nage’s foot pointing to little toe of Uke’s foot.)
  • During the two-step the Nage expresses Kokyu in the captured hand.  This exposes the palm and wrist of the attacking hand.  (This completes the blend portion.)
  • Nage’s free hand grasps Uke hand in a Shihonage grasp.  (I could not find a good picture, take one) The grasp involves your hand covering the “palm” portion of their hand.  Your pinky finger should wrap around the knife edge of their hand, while your thumb grasps the knuckle on the back if their thumb.
  • In Ura Waza there is no “step-through” like in Omote.  Instead the Nage performs the 180 degree turn and using the shoulder-to-shoulder technique described in the Omote Waza version of Katata Dori Shihonage.
  • At this point Uke should be ready to be thrown.  Drop your center just a bit and Uke should start to fall in the direction that you are facing. The timing here is important.  You MUST step with Uke as they fall and bring your hand down so that you do not separate their hand from their shoulder. If you do not perform this carefully and with compassion you can damage Uke’s trapped wrist.
    • Let the start to fall first, figure out where Uke’s shoulder will touch the floor, and then step to that point and bring the captured hand to that point.
    • If you try to step first, you will most likely have to play “catch-up” which will result in your taking too many steps and not being in the correct position to keep the strain off the wrist.
  • Things to considerations when performing this technique:
    • If your opponent spins out during the lead perform the step through again.  (You can even get it tighter.)
    • If you catch your opponent spinning out while you perform your rotation you can “short-cut” the move by stepping back early. (Takes some practice, and this is not a cheat.)
    • Make sure to keep shoulder contact with Uke during all parts of this technique.
    • Before the throw Uke may choose to grasp the Nage’s ghi to insure that excessive separation does not occur during the throw.
  • The Pin to this technique is just holding the captured hand to the ground.  Head up. Back straight.  Be aware of other attackers.

Munetski Kotegaeshi

  • Uke and Nage are in Gyankuhamni.

Morote, Ryote, Katate, Variations

Bokken: 1-7 Suburi

Jo: 1-5 Suburi

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